Jamie's Notes

Currently browsing the month of January, 2019 ⤵

Living dangerously

A year with the National Trust

Last year we joined the National Trust. It wasn’t something that we had considered before, but after arriving at Fountains Abbey on Boxing Day and realising it would cost us an arm and a leg to get in, we signed up to their family membership plan to spread the cost. It was a good deal on the day because we didn’t have to spend forty quid on the entrance fee, but whether the £120 spread over the year was worth it remained to be proved. Since I am a massive nerd, I kept track of what we spent over the year.

Without membership we would have paid £242.90 (including £17 parking charges), so we saved £113. Not bad! If cost is the only metric, membership has proved to be very good value for money. Having the card in our pocket (and the monthly direct debit going out) pushed us to get out as often as possible, and they were all well worth the visit.

Here’s a list of the National Trust properties that we visited:

Unfortunately there are only a dozen national trust properties within a couple of hours drive of us, and we’ve done the majority of them now. Some of the properties are massive and need more than one visit, so I’ve renewed the membership this year so that we can go back and explore those further and maybe visit a couple of the ones further out. I can’t see that it would be worth renewing further than that unless we move somewhere else, but we only need to visit five or six properties to cover the cost.

Here’s some photos from our year with the National Trust:

Millington Woods

Millington Woods lies in a small valley in the middle of nowhere. Technically it’s in the Yorkshire Wolds, but with the exception of the nearby village from which it gets its name it’s miles away from anything resembling modern civilisation.

The woods have never been busy when I’ve visited, but the few people who you might meet will be the polite sort that wish you a good morning as they pass. We had the wood to ourselves this morning, and all that could be heard was bird calls, a light breeze murmuring through the trees and blissful silence.

The wood is best known for its ancient ash trees, but I’m partial to the Norwegian Spruce which stands tall and magisterial among its peers.